A Tale of Two Cities: Neighbourhood segregation by income in two urban case studies

~ 12145 ~ A Tale of Two Cities: Neighbourhood segregation by income in two urban case studies ~ Jim Bennett Jim Bennett
Published Mon 28 Apr 2008
Different national, regional and local processes can lead to income segregation at the neighbourhood level. Policy and economic drivers interact with the processes of income segregation at different spatial scales. This research focuses on the processes at the local level. In particular, it explores the relationship between a neighbourhood's income profile, and the housing market.

It is now well understood that people living in deprived areas have poorer access to goods and services, frequently experience lower quality goods and services, and often have to pay more for these goods and services than those in better off areas. There is also evidence that living in an area of concentrated deprivation tends to exacerbate residents' problems, compromising health, educational outcomes and employment.

Different national, regional and local processes can lead to income segregation at the neighbourhood level. Policy and economic drivers interact with the processes of income segregation at different spatial scales. This research focuses on the processes at the local level. In particular, it explores the relationship between a neighbourhood's income profile, and the housing market.

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