Those who can?

~ 12170 ~ Those who can? ~ Sonia Sodha Sonia Sodha, ~ 12176 ~ Those who can? ~ Julia Margo Julia Margo, ~ 12293 ~ Those who can? ~ Sarah Tough Sarah Tough, ~ 12363 ~ Those who can? ~ Meghan Benton Meghan Benton
Published Mon 5 May 2008
The world in which teachers must now operate is much changed from that of the 1980s and even the 1990s. During that time, political reforms have both helped and hindered teaching. Developments in technology and media have altered the way in which information is accessed, processed and shared by young people and have changed leisure and social experiences beyond recognition. Shifts in family formation, which began before the 1980s, have continued to alter the context in which schooling takes place. This report considers the implications of these trends for teaching in England. It also explores the central role that teachers play in pupil attainment and development.

The world in which teachers must now operate is much changed from that of the 1980s and even the 1990s. During that time, political reforms have both helped and hindered teaching. Developments in technology and media have altered the way in which information is accessed, processed and shared by young people and have changed leisure and social experiences beyond recognition. Shifts in family formation, which began before the 1980s, have continued to alter the context in which schooling takes place.

 

It is increasingly the case that teachers cannot expect parents to have universal cultural norms or expectations about education, and must deal with varying levels of parental interest and engagement. And teachers have to deal with increasingly challenging behaviour, and are expected to perform expanded, more proactive roles in young people's lives.

 

This report considers the implications of these trends for teaching in England. It also explores the central role that teachers play in pupil attainment and development.

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