Skip navigation
The Progressive Policy Think Tank

Budget: Richest 10 per cent get almost half of gains from tax cuts, finds IPPR

  • 48 per cent of gains made from changes to income tax and national insurance contributions go to the richest decile 

  • Levelling-up undermined as London and the South East gain much more than other regions, with Northern Ireland and North East benefitting the least 

The highest earners in the UK will disproportionately benefit from personal tax cuts announced by the chancellor in today’s fiscal event, with the richest 10 per cent of the population receiving 48 per cent of the gains, finds IPPR. 

The poorest 10 per cent of society meanwhile will see less than 1 per cent of the financial benefit. In fact, the poorer half of society will share just 12 per cent of the money between them. 

People living in the London and the South East of England will see significantly larger gains than those living in the rest of the country. Londoners will see double the income growth compared to households in Northern Ireland, putting the government’s levelling-up commitments at serious risk. 

Henry Parkes, senior economist at IPPR, said:  

“This mini-budget was a maxi-boost for the richest, and shows a government staggeringly out of touch with lower and middle earners. As the country grapples with a cost-of-living crisis, soaring energy bills and high levels of inflation, tax cuts for millionaires should not be the priority. 

“Worryingly, these cuts will also undermine the levelling-up agenda. Families across Wales, Northern Ireland and the north of England will feel more left behind than ever. If the government really wants to help ordinary people, then they would be better off investing in what the economy actually needs – better health, education and skills.” 

ENDS 

Dr George Dibb, head of the centre for economic justice at IPPR, is available for interview 

CONTACT 

Liam Evans, Senior Digital and Media Officer: 07419 365334 [email protected] 

David Wastell, Director of News and Communications: 07921 403651 [email protected]  

NOTES TO EDITORS 

  1. IPPR is the UK’s pre-eminent progressive think tank. With more than 40 staff in offices in London, Manchester, Newcastle and Edinburgh, IPPR is Britain’s only national think tank with a truly national presence. www.ippr.org 

  1. Table: Distribution of gains from Income Tax and National Insurance changes by equivalized income decile (after housing costs) (2023/24) 

Income decile 

Distribution of gains from tax cuts 

1 (poorest) 

1% 

1% 

2% 

3% 

5% 

6% 

8% 

11% 

15% 

10 (richest) 

48% 

  1. Table: Average growth in household income from changes to National Insurance and Income Tax (2023/24) 

Region 

Average growth in income from tax cuts 

Northern Ireland 

1.4% 

North East  

1.6% 

Wales 

1.6% 

East Midlands 

1.7% 

South West 

1.7% 

North West 

1.8% 

West Midlands 

1.8% 

Yorkshire & the Humber 

1.9% 

East of England 

2.2% 

South East 

2.6% 

London 

3.0%